Guest Commentary

A tribune to a talented musician, teacher

Mark A. Schaeperkoetter
Posted 3/3/21

Many often remember an encounter with someone they’ve known for a long time.

My first meeting with Mr. Charles Feagan occurred upon arrival at Owens- ville High School in the early 60’s as a …

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Guest Commentary

A tribune to a talented musician, teacher

Posted

Many often remember an encounter with someone they’ve known for a long time.

My first meeting with Mr. Charles Feagan occurred upon arrival at Owens- ville High School in the early 60’s as a graduate of the Mt. Sterling one-room country school which was unable to provide band, complex science classes or organized sports.

Band was out of the question for all of us. My grandmothers and mother taught me a love of singing which I still do loudly today often to the disdain of others. Mr. Feagan was one of two adults in the music room during high school.

Off to college, the Army, more school and back to Owensville to work in the bank where we renewed out acquaintance.

In 1974 he became “Charley” to me at his request. We were both in a Maifest

Rotunda Show in Hermann. He the drum- mer for the Hungry Five, me a member of the show cast.

Rehearsal started in February, the show the third week of May. He and Ken Baur needed no rehearsal. Al Kirschner, the comedian of the cast, said the two came just to laugh at the rest of us. When it was all hands on deck for the final week and dress rehearsal for the workers in the Maifest, the out-of-towners stayed in the basement of Dr. George Workman’s home across from the City Park.

Usually eight shows in total for the weekend, countless hours of memoriza- tion and never enough enjoyable hours melding the production into 50 minutes of showtime of such quality finding all SRO spaces filled before the doors were wedged shut and a guard posted to ensure the fire marshal was kept busy.

On one occasion, a two-show post Maifest encore was performed in a larger venue. Always the consummate profes- sional, Charley never missed a beat (pun intended) for two reasons, he loved what he did and he loved being great company and being with great company.

I do not know the history of the Hun- gry Five. Now only Tom Warden and Bob Kirchhofer live to strum a banjo or blow a note, nor do I know the date of their last performance. One thing I do know, Gasconade County lost one of its most well known, respected, loved and revered people. Charley, don’t let anyone rest in peace in Heaven. Pound those cymbals, beat that drum and get in the band or start one.

Lucky to be one of your multitude of friends.

Mark A. Schaeperkoetter

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