Lawsuits between City of Gerald, Bull Moose Tube have been terminated

By Linda Trest, Staff Writer
Posted 9/3/20

A special meeting of the Gerald Board of Aldermen held Thursday, Aug. 27, ended with a surprise twist.

After a 17-minute executive session, the board returned to open meeting to pass an …

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Lawsuits between City of Gerald, Bull Moose Tube have been terminated

Posted

A special meeting of the Gerald Board of Aldermen held Thursday, Aug. 27, ended with a surprise twist.

After a 17-minute executive session, the board returned to open meeting to pass an ordinance. The bill authorized Mayor Hillary Ward to sign a settlement agreement with Bull Moose Tube Co.(BMT).

The city and BMT have been embroiled in a lawsuit since Feb. 2018 concerning property the city leases to the tubing manufacturer. Attorneys from Cunningham, Vogel & Rost, P. C.

Judge Gael Woods in that lawsuit issued a declaratory judgment against the city in September 2019. The city appealed the decision.

Monday, Sept. 31, Margaret Eveker, an attorney acting on the city’s behalf, filed a motion for dismissal in the appellate court.

The bill signed last Thursday also authorizes the mayor to sign other related documents, including selling the building and land occupied by BMT, but owned by the city.

A bill of sale attached to the ordinance lists a sales price of $225,000.

Both parties were expected to finalize the property transfer Friday, Aug. 28.

The city touts this move as an effort to keep the plant and its employees located in the city.

“Bull Moose is an important employer and vital member of our community,” wrote David A. Struebel, city attorney in a prepared press release. “We are looking forward to many more years of a successful relationship with the company.”

Ward 2 Alderman Ed Adams, speaking on behalf of the city, told The Republican that the bulk of the attorneys’ fees are settled. The only remaining fees will be those incurred by the legal work involved with transferring the property.

There has been much speculation as to how much the legal battle has cost the city. Adams would not reveal how much the final bill was or how much of profit from the sale of the property would go towards attorney fees.

“The people will be able to figure that out in due time,” was all he would say on the advice of the city’s attorney.

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