Health Commentary

Stay current on vaccinations

Posted 8/26/20

Students across Missouri are preparing for the upcoming school year. Whether in person, virtual or a combination of both, it is important that students are up to date on routine vaccinations to help …

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Health Commentary

Stay current on vaccinations

Posted

Students across Missouri are preparing for the upcoming school year. Whether in person, virtual or a combination of both, it is important that students are up to date on routine vaccinations to help keep themselves, their classmates and family safe — especially as flu season approaches.
With many people putting off routine preventive care because of the pandemic, as we look toward fall and winter months, now is the time to connect with pediatricians and your local public health department to make sure children are current on any needed vaccines. Public health experts along with the One for All Missouri campaign would like to share the following reminders on vaccinations to ensure a safe and healthy school year.
Schedule an appointment with your pediatrician or local public health office as soon as possible.
Students from kindergarten to grade 12 will need to have their regular vaccinations prior to attending school.
Talk to your doctor if you have any questions regarding the vaccinations required for your child.
The flu vaccine will be especially important this year. Flu vaccines are recommended for everyone over 6 months old and are available for free or a very low cost in pharmacies, local public health departments or at your doctor’s office.
Both COVID-19 and the flu can have varying degrees of signs and symptoms. Common symptoms that COVID-19 and the flu share include:
• Fever or feeling chills
• Cough
• Shortness of breath
• Fatigue
• Sore throat
• Runny or stuffy nose
• Muscle pain or body aches
• Headache
While COVID-19 and the flu share common symptoms, there are key differences — including the time it takes to develop symptoms and the period of time someone remains contagious.
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that everyone 6 months of age or older get an annual flu vaccine early in the fall, and if possible by the end of October.
The single best way to prevent the flu is to get a flu vaccine every year.
You can get a flu vaccine from your physician, local health department, federally funded health center, urgent care, and most major pharmacies and quick clinics.
Practice preventive measures with your child to establish healthy habits and stop the spread of germs.
Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue or your sleeve when you cough or sneeze.
Wash your hands often with soap and water.
Wear a face covering over your nose and mouth when you leave the house and at school.
Stay home if you are feeling sick.

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